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Route 53 for VMware Horizon

Amazon Route 53 is a highly available and scalable cloud Domain Name System (DNS) web service. It is designed to give developers and businesses an extremely reliable and cost-effective way to route end users to Internet applications by translating names like http://www.example.com into the numeric IP addresses like 192.0.2.1 that computers use to connect to each other.

We will use Route 53 to create a DNS record that will point us to a public IP address we are requesting via VMware Cloud on AWS and pointing to our UAG.

With Route 53 we have three options. Either register a new domain or transfer an existing domain to Route 53 or you can just create a hosted zone with your existing domain. We created a domain under GoDaddy to create a domain but want to use route 53 for the global DNS. So we created a new hosted zone. By creating this hosted zone, AWS will provide NS entries

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We need these NS values and put them into the domain DNS configuration under the GoDaddy account. That way we can use AWS Route 53 as a DNS server.

Now that we have a hosted zone in AWS Route 53 we can create A records. But we will come back to that point.
In our Horizon environment, we have a UAG server and a Connection Server. We can now request a public IP in VMC and then NAT it to our UAG to make it public accessible.

Request a Public IP is really easy.

This Public IP we will use to create a NAT rule now. Before i can create the NAT rule i need to find out the internal IP of my UAG Server:

Now that we know it is on the 192.168.40.4 we can create a appropriate NAT rule.

Back in the VMC console under Netowrking & Security We click on NAT.

With this we have the public IP adress that will point to our UAG. Now we can create a DNS record pointing to this Public IP address.

Going back to the AWS console under Route 53 the newly created hosted zone we can click on ” Create A record” We will create a new A record for horizon.vdionvmc.com. By creating a new A record we have different policies we can set.

  • Simple routing policy – Use for a single resource that performs a given function for your domain, for example, a web server that serves content for the example.com website.
  • Failover routing policy – Use when you want to configure active-passive failover.
  • Geolocation routing policy – Use when you want to route traffic based on the location of your users.
  • Geoproximity routing policy – Use when you want to route traffic based on the location of your resources and, optionally, shift traffic from resources in one location to resources in another.
  • Latency routing policy – Use when you have resources in multiple AWS Regions and you want to route traffic to the region that provides the best latency.
  • Multivalue answer routing policy – Use when you want Route 53 to respond to DNS queries with up to eight healthy records selected at random.
  • Weighted routing policy – Use to route traffic to multiple resources in proportions that you specify.

Once we have the A record created we need to wait a view minutes until it is propagated to all DNS server.

After a view minutes we can check via a simple nslookup if the dns record is propagated to all public dns hosts:

If it is the case we can try to open a browser an connect to our Horizon environment.

Using Route 53 is an easy way to get a high available global load balancer.

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